Flowers through a Window

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Several months back, I purchased this old window at a savage sale, and finally, I decided to do something with it. I found an image online of similar-styled flowers, and I was inspired!

I find it rather annoying to paint on windows. I just use acrylic paint, but if you know of short cut or trick, I would love to know! Though I do like that if you make a mistake, you can easily wipe it off and start again.

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Baby Carrots

Growing carrots requires patience – lots and lots of patience. But after almost 2 months, I finally have something to show.

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I read in an old Southern Living Garden Book that it is vital to thin out the carrots at this point, removing some of the small carrots to make room for the rest. Easy. With all of the rain this summer in the Southeast, I have really been able to ignore the carrots and let them grow.

If you want to plant your own carrots in a 5 gallon bucket, read my original post [here].

DIY Anthropolgie’s “Pomdelion Bouquet”

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If you are like me and treat the Anthropolgie’s website like Pinterest, then you too will notice that some of the expensive items they sell are actually really easy (and very cheap) projects you can make yourself. Take for example the store’s “Pomdelion Bouquet.” You can buy these yarn pom-pom flowers for $18 each or make as many as you want for less than $5.

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I’ve made these flowers before and explained how to make them in a pervious post (aren’t I so trendy.) But I will give Anthropolgie’s credit for using the golden-yellow colored yarn. Lucky for me, my roommate had some leftover yarn of the same color from a Harry Potter scarf she made months before.

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Once I made the pom-poms (again, see link posted above), I simply glued on a piece of green felt as the leaves and a piece of floral wire as the stem.

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With a cute vase from Ikea, these yarn dandelions were the perfect addition to my cubicle at work.

 

Something Beautiful

When I lived in Washington D.C. last summer, I would wander the halls of the National Museum of Art and feel envious of the painters who were allowed to spend hours recreating the masterpieces that hung on its walls. On certain lazy Sundays, I like to take up the practice of mimicking another’s work. Though it may sound strange, I find the practice rather relaxing, but truly, studying the stroke and technique of another painter is the best way to grow as a painter yourself. Today, I decided to bask in the art of flowers (ones first created by Erin Gregory).

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Quilting with Moroccan Fabric

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Having traveled to the cold land of the hot sun –  aka Moracco – twice now, I have found myself with several meters of fabric that are calling to be used. On my second trip to North Africa, I purposely bought a meter of a different color of the same fabric with the idea of making a quilt. With such beautiful fabric, I wanted to keep the quilt simple, so I mapped out a basic square pattern – one that could easily be used to make a t-shirt quilt.

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You can see the dimensions I worked with in the picture above. The squares were 11.5 x 11.5 inches, and I used a 0.5 inch seam allowance.

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Since I was working with woven fabric, I prevented frayed edges by using the basic zigzag stitch to act like an overlocking stitch. It  was a tedious process, but completely necessary. Fabric can still fray even after you stitch the pieces together.

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Once I finished the edges, it was a quick process to sew all of the individual squares into the rows and then the rows into a quilt. Again, I used a 0.5 inch seam allowance throughout.

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With the middle squares in place, I used a off-white canvas fabric to act as a margin of color – another simple touch to highlight the beauty of the fabric. The strips were 7 inches wide. I used the canvas fabric to match the thickness of the Morroccan fabric, but for the back fabric and binding, I used cotton. To see how I bind quilts, you can visit my previous post on the matter.

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I couldn’t be more happy with the finished product. It achieved the goal that I wanted – something that could show off the beautiful, hand-woven fabric as well as encapsulate my memories of purchasing the fabric on my travels. You just can’t find fabric like this here in America – well, as least not for the price that I paid for them.

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I found the fabric for the back side of the quilt at Handcock Fabrics, and it worked perfectly.  For the back side, I think the fabric needs to be simple enough to not trump the front, but interesting enough to add to the overall look of the quilt. This fabric did just that.

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This pattern is easy and simple to recreate since pieces are large, and you work with straight lines. Please feel free to ask any questions you have; I would love to help you as you work to create a quilt for yourself.

3rd Grade Art

IMG_2523Thanks to the wonders of Facebook, a friend sent me a picture of a painting I made in the 3rd grade that still hangs on the walls of my elementary school. Crazy! She informs me that it decorates the walls of the school’s media center. I feel so honored.

 

Growing Carrots in a 5-Gallon Bucket

 

Since I graduated from college three weeks ago, my new roommate says I have taken on a new obsession to help with the transition: gardening. (A little bit of dirt is good for the soul.) A few years ago, I heard of a neighbor growing carrots in a 5-gallon bucket, and finally, I decided to try it out for myself.
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This project began at my parent’s house (because they have tools and I do not). First step was buying the list below:

  • 5-gallon bucket (The Home Depot had them on sale at the end of each aisle. A bucket cost about $2)
  • A bag of rocks
  • Potting soil
  • Carrot seeds 

I also needed things I found in at my parent’s house

  • Hammer
  • Screw driver

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Before I can pour in the dirt, I prepared the bucket by poking holes in the bottom using a hammer and screwdriver. I found that the holes I made near the center of the bucket caused cracks (which I did not want). So, just beware that can happen. IMG_2713

With holes finished, I put a 3-inch layer of rocks at the bottom of the bucket. I purchased river pebbles, but if I was to do it again, I probably would have used larger rocks.
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Next, I filled the bucket up with dirt. IMG_2715

I read online that carrot seeds should be sown in about 1-inch deep of dirt. And that I could sew a good amount of seeds (like 40-60). So I did. (This is the point of the project where you should know that I am 100% a novice gardener. I can tell you what I did, but I do not know if this is correct.)IMG_2718

But with that being said, after a week of being in full-sun and being watered everyday, I had sprouts! I am not sure how long this growing process will take, but I will need you updated. The lesson to be learned – If I can do it, so can you!IMG_2791