Felt Christmas Poinsettia

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When I came home with the wrong size terra cotta pots (The felt cactuses I sell on Etsy use 3-inch pots; I purchased 2-inch pots), I decided to make the most of my mistake. The result were these adorable, mini felt poinsettias.

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Similar to the felt cactuses I sell, each flower is attached to felt “dirt” and come with a real clay pot.  Teach your little ones to love gardening early on as they can “plant” their flowers over and over again. (And bonus, no mess to clean up or dead plants to deal with.)

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To create the flower, I used a similar approach to how I create the cactus flower. I took a small rectangle of yellow felt and cut slits along the width. I did the same with a small white rectangular piece of felt. I then rolled up the yellow felt and continued with the white, creating the center. Next, I hand-cut the red petals (sorry, I don’t have templates) – 5 smaller petals and 5 slightly larger ones – and 4 large green leaves. I then attach them one-by-one until the flower is complete.

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The miniature size is what gets me. My gosh, these flowers are just so darn cute!

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Rosemary Wreaths

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Growing up, my mother had the best mottos to live by. My favorite: “Always know what makes you happy.” So when the struggles of life seem too much to handle, you know what activities or items can help pull you up. For me, crafting is my go-to tool for happiness.

My Thanksgiving was a week of personal struggles. I had to have surgery on my left eye. The anticipation was a heavy mental burden, and the post-op pain and physical injury was not easy either. So on Sunday after my surgery, when I was finally starting to feel more normal, I sat down and created a simple rosemary wreath.

I didn’t worry about taking pictures of my process (sorry), but trust me, rosemary wreaths are so easy to create. And I was able to use items I already had available.

I used an embroidery hoop as my wreath’s base. (You could use so many other forms, but this is something I already had at the house). Using more heavy-duty scissors, I cut 8-inch sprigs of rosemary from my parent’s garden. Then I made small bundles (with 2 or 3 sprigs each) and use a rubber band to secure each one. Then I used floral wire to secure each bundle to the embroidery hoop. And if necessary, I used the floral wire to secure a few odd sprigs that didn’t flow well in the circular shape.

And that’s it. The 30 minutes it took to create this wreath did wonders for my overall well-being. Plus, it made the room smell so wonderful! Pardon the cheesiness, but these moments of happiness are the best kind of medicine.

[Felt] Leaves are in the Air

Do you find it strange that fall is so colorful? I mean, not to get too philosophical, but even in the midst of the dying leaves, natures bursts forth a new color spectrum. God is pretty spectacular.

And those my felt leaves in no way compare to the real thing, they are still fun to make!

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My friend Melissa asked me to make a bunch of felt leaves she could use to create a wreath. She wanted a variety of shapes and colors, so I happily obliged. After cutting out the leaves (I did use stencils for some of them), I used thread to stitch in the veins. But since I knew she wanted to make a wreath, I didn’t care to cover up the back side.

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With the leaves, Melissa wrapped a foam ring with raffia and used a hot glue fun to attach the leaves. The finished product came together wonderfully! I love it so much, I feel like I need to make another one for myself!

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Office Decor: A Cubicle Fiesta

A handful of my co-workers take birthdays very serious. One co-worker in particular went above and beyond (aka asked HR) to find out the date of everyone’s birthday in the office. (She keeps our master calendar.) So when it happens be the birthday of one of these individuals, we like to go all out – well, as far out as you can go with streamers and poster boards.

Most recently, we selected a theme, and you know me, I love a good theme.

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Naturally, I started with Pinterest and stumbled across this adorable phrase. (You can make fun of me, but I just think it’s hilarious!) And then, to create the texture of a pinata, I cut a  row of small slits in steamer (or crepe) paper. I layered the different color pieces on top of each other and taped them down on the back.

If I had more time, I wanted to make a matching pinata (but alas, there are only so many hours in a day). But if I had the time, I would have used the same technique to cover the cardboard.

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My other addition to the decorations was this mini garland of this fiesta bunting. Though I think it’s original purpose is for cake decorating, I knew my friend would appreciate the miniature decor. For the free printable (click here).

Hand-Stitch a Star Chart

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A needle and thread are the only tools you need to recreate the night sky. My love for the stars and their constellation stories are not new. (You might remember my first constellation-themed project with a pair of Toms.) So when I began to brainstorm new projects to help decorate my new desk at work, I ended reverting back to a favorite, creating this hand-stitched star chart banner.

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Like my pair of Toms, I started by splatter-painting the material with silver paint, but this time, I used a piece of navy muslin fabric. (Sorry, I did not make note of dimensions) This process helps create the look of infinite stars, adding a beautiful layer of dimension. Once done with the silver paint, I did splatter on a little white paint too.

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Once the paint dries, I start with my needle and thread. I printed off a a star chart to help with a few constellations, but for the most part, I stitched everything from memory. If you don’t feel comfortable doing this, use an erasable fabric marker to draw the constellations before stitching. Along with the constellations, I stitched several additional starts to help fill in the spaces between constellations.

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To finish, I took a matching piece of navy muslin, and placed the two pieces right sides together. Using my sewing machine, I sewed them together using a 3/4 inch seam. At the top, I skipped over an inch on each side to leave room for the wood rod. After turning the fabric right-sides-out, I ironed it, placed the wood rod, and used hemp string to hang the banner.

Embroidery Hoop for a Wedding

I love, love, love this idea for a wedding shower gift. (So much that this my second time to use the idea.) An embroidery hoop with the couple’s names or initials along with the date of the big day creates a personal (and colorful) gift. And I like to think that if I give it to the bride at a shower, she might use it to decorate her reception.

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I kind-of lucked out with the initials of the bride and groom. I debated for a few hours if I should use their names (Wes & Meg), but I finally settled on use their initials. I’m obsessed with the symmetry.

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A image on Pinterest inspired me to try the branches, and I think it turned out great. I had very little of the brown thread,  so I decided to have two different branches: one with brown thread and medium green leaves and the other with golden yellow thread and dark green leaves.

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Finally – the all important wedding date! I used French knots to separate the numbers.

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To hide the backside of the stitches, I hot glued a circle of felt – with a felt heart – to the back.

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I figure why hide this beautiful creature with wrapping paper, so instead of wrapping the hoop, I decided to use it as a gift tag. By threading the string through clasp, the hoop will stay in place.

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A Simple Arrangement of Sunflowers

This past weekend, my friends and I threw a bridal shower for my friend Caroline. And though the entire shower could be described with words like adorable, sweet and beautiful, this idea for displaying sunflowers, I think, took the cake.

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I am obsessed with how simple the arrangement is. The trick is owning 11 bud vases that can support the weight of a sunflower. If you’re like me and do not, I’m thinking about investing in a dozen of these from Ikea. (only $1.99 each)

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